Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination Gallery Views: The Anna Wintour Costume Center

By | September 4, 2019


In the Anna Wintour Costume Center, we have
masterworks from The Vatican Collection. When you first walk down the stairs, you’re confronted
with a chasuble designed by Henri Matisse. The Lizzie and John Tisch Galleries, primarily
focusing on vestments—mantles, chasubles, dalmatics—that belonged to particular popes
dating from the mid-eighteenth century through to John Paul II, displayed in a minimal way,
to really direct your focus to the embroidery of the pieces, which is incredibly refined. You see a cassock that was worn by Saint John
Paul II, including his red slippers, which were created by a cobbler within Italy. Many of the chasubles, many of the mantles, were
worn by several popes, up to Pope Francis’s tenure. Most of the garments are white, embroidered
with gold, which was a conceit for papal attire. They’re grouped within particular suites,
and one of the most important suites is a suite that was given to Pope Pius IX by the
empress of Austria, that took fifteen women almost sixteen years to embroider. And in the Iris Apfel Gallery, it’s looking
at accessories—so mitres and papal tiaras, papal rings, pectoral crosses, that were usually
given as gifts to specific popes. Many were still in use, even some of the earlier
pieces, for particular liturgical ceremonies within Saint Peter’s Basilica. One of the highlights of that particular gallery
is a papal tiara that was given to Pope Pius IX by Queen Isabella II of Spain, that contains nineteen
thousand gems, primarily comprising diamonds.

9 thoughts on “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination Gallery Views: The Anna Wintour Costume Center

  1. NELOHAGEN Post author

    amazing display and obviously amazing collection….omgggg

    Reply
  2. LagiNaLangAko23 Post author

    They keep getting simpler as time go by. I like it.

    Reply
  3. cristianonyc mancini Post author

    Just because Thom Browne is the boyfriend of curator Andrew Bolton doesn't mean that he deserved to be displayed in the exhibition . There are way more talented designers that should have been considered but were totally ignored. Nepotisim ! Shame on the Met !

    Reply
  4. Cappy-go-lucky Post author

    That triple crown is very symbolically powerful

    Reply
  5. jhs graphiko Post author

    Blasphemy!https://youtu.be/1u4dznxzyw0

    Reply
  6. Leon N Post author

    How I wish I can visit the museum! Lovely exhibition! 🙁

    Reply

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